Imprint

Details compliant with § 5 of the German Teleservices Act:

Law firm:

Gramm, Lins & Partner
Patent- und Rechtsanwälte PartGmbB
Theodor-Heuss-Str. 1
38122 Braunschweig

Legal form:
Partnerschaftsgesellschaft mbB (partnership with limited professional liability)

Court of registration: Hanover Regional Court
Registration sheet: PR 200777
VAT ID: DE 114 888 952

Contact:
Tel.: +49 531 28140-0
Fax: +49 531 28140-28
E-mail: braunschweig@grammpatent.de

Partners authorized to represent the firm: Dr. Edgar Lins, Hanns-Peter Schrammek, Thorsten Rehmann, Dr. Martina Lins, Joachim Gerstein, Christian S. Drzymalla, Kai Stornebel, Dr. Stefan Risthaus, Dr. Rolf Kröncke, Dr.-Ing. Jan Plöger, Sebastian Aisch, Dr. Andreas Friedrich

Attorney authorization:
All of the patent attorneys and attorneys at law who work at Gramm, Lins & Partner are authorized to practice under German Law.

The attorneys at Gramm, Lins & Partner are members of the Braunschweig Bar Association, Lessingplatz 1, 38100 Braunschweig (www.rak-braunschweig.de).

The following professional rules of conduct apply to the attorneys: 

  • Berufsordnung für Rechtsanwälte (BORA; Professional Rules for Attorneys at Law)
  • Fachanwaltsordnung (FAO; Specialized Attorney Regulations)
  • Rechtsanwaltsvergütungsgesetz (RVG; Attorney Remuneration Law)
  • Professional rules for attorneys in the European Union (CCBE Code of Conduct)
  • Additional rules of professional conduct relating to the Geldwäschebekämpfungsgesetz (GwG; Money Laundering Act)

The professional rules of conduct for attorneys can be viewed and accessed in German and English at the website or the German Federal Chamber of Attorneys (www.brak.de) in the section entitled ‘Berufsrecht’.

The patent attorneys at Gramm, Lins & Partner are members of the Chamber of Patent Attorneys, Tal 29, 80331 Munich (www.patentanwalt.de) and members of the Fédération Internationale des Conseils en Propriété Industrielle (www.ficpi.org).

The following professional rules of conduct apply to patent attorneys:

  • Berufsordnung der Patentanwälte (PatAnwO; Code of Professional Conduct for Patent Attorneys)
  • Additional rules of professional conduct relating to the Geldwäschebekämpfungsgesetz (GwG; Money Laundering Act)
  • Professional standards of the Fédération Internationale des Conseils en Propriété Industrielle (FICPI)

Gramm, Lins & Partner’s authorized representatives at the European Patent Office (European Patent Attorneys) are members of the epi (European Institute of Professional Representatives before the European Patent Office (www.patentepi.com) and are subject to the epi Code of Professional Conduct.

The professional rules of conduct applying to patent attorneys and authorized representatives at the European Patent Office can be viewed at the websites of the Chamber of Patent Attorneys, the FICPI, and epi.

Professional liability insurance
Zurich Insurance plc, Germany Branch
Solmsstr. 27-37
60486 Frankfurt am Main
Territorial validity: worldwide.

Concept & Design:
propaganda.  Agentur für  Werbung GmbH, Braunschweig

Photography:
Heidrun Gramm, Braunschweig

Disclaimer:
This website is provided solely as information. It does not contain any legal advice or expert opinion. We do not accept any liability for any loss or disadvantage arising from using the information on this website.

We do not accept any liability for the content of linked websites. Responsibility for the content is borne exclusively by those operating such sites.

Possible impact of Brexit on European industrial property rights

On March 29, 2017 the electorate of the United Kingdom submitted the declaration to resign from the European Union. As it currently stands, the departure is expected to come into effect in March 2019.

It is anticipated that Brexit will have an impact on the trademark protection that currently applies to European Union trademarks (EU trademarks) in the United Kingdom. It is still unclear as to how exactly the departure of the United Kingdom will affect the existing protection of EU trademarks. In the main, the following scenarios are conceivable:

  1. EU trademarks are no longer effective in the United Kingdom. Replacements can be obtained by means of national British trademarks or IR trademarks designating Great Britain without the possibility to claim priority of corresponding EU trademarks;

  2. The same scenario as described above, but with the possibility to claim priority of the EU trademark existent at the time at which Brexit comes into effect, with regards to a new national registration or the IR designation of Great Britain;

  3. An agreement is made between the United Kingdom and the European Union pursuant to which EU trademarks shall remain valid in the United Kingdom despite Brexit.

 We deem the latter scenario unlikely, as it would contradict the notion of the United Kingdom's departure from the EU.

We believe the second scenario to be likely, as it would prevent a scramble for the registration of trademarks in the British trademark register and the large number of disputes this would be likely to cause. Under the good assumption that this second scenario comes to pass, one could wait until the legal framework has been set up and the corresponding registration and/or conversion procedures established. However, owners of EU trademarks who do not wish to rely on this outcome could claim corresponding trademark protection in the United Kingdom in advance, so as to secure earliest possible priority. This may be done by registering a national trademark at the UK Intellectual Property Office or via a (subsequent) extension of an international registration (IR trademark). In particular, if the filing of an international registration is planned, which should be effective in the European Union, the United Kingdom could be designated (relatively inexpensively) as a party of the international trademark.

With regards to registered Community designs (EU designs), the above applies accordingly. Owners of a registered Community design who do not wish to rely on the establishment of a procedure for the conversion into a national registered design could apply for the registration of a national design in the United Kingdom. Unfortunately, international registered designs cannot be extended to the United Kingdom, as it did not accede to the Hague Agreement Concerning the International Deposit of Industrial Designs.

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